CMES Research Seminar: Politics Makes for Strange Bedfellows – Exigency and Sectarian Politics in Lebanon

Rola El-Husseini Dean gives a talk on sectarian politics in Lebanon.

When: 14 October 2021 13:15 to 14:30 (CEST)
Where: Zoom + CMES seminar Room, Finngatan 16
Registration: Follow this link to register for the event

To register, please CMES event page

UI Seminar: Socioeconomic Drivers of Protests in the MENA Region

The Middle East and North Africa Programme at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs invites you to a webinar analysing socio-economic drivers of protests in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region focusing on the contexts of Tunisia, Algeria and Lebanon.

Ten years after the Arab uprisings, that toppled dictators and briefly reshuffled the established status quo in several Arab countries, the region is still experiencing protests and popular demonstrations.

Long standing issues related to entrenched social inequalities, deep-seated corruption, recurring economic crises and the disintegration of the social contract are further weakening the already fragile state-society relationship in states across the region. With citizens’ growing mistrust in political institutions, protests is viewed by many as the main avenue to express discontent and demand structural changes.

With these dynamics in mind, this seminar focuses on a comparative analysis of socioeconomic drivers of protests in Tunisia, Lebanon, and Algeria, examining different repertoires of contention and state responses to popular demonstrations.

What socioeconomic grievances drive contemporary protest movements in the Middle East and North Africa region? How are they different from what brought people to the streets to protest during the Arab Spring? Are there any similarities between the movements in different countries in the region?

Panel:
Lina Khatib, Director, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham House
Youssef Cherif, Director, Columbia Global Centers, Tunis
Linda El-Naggar, Analyst, Middle East and North Africa Programme, UI

Moderator:
Lucia Ardovini, Research Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme, UI

Use this link to register

A report on the challenges meeting development actors in Lebanon

Lebanon’s disadvantaged face a long uphill battle

Author: Bitte Hammargren
2021

SKL International

Abstract

A report on the challenges and opportunities for donors and development actors in Lebanon, a country torn by multiple crises. The focus area is Akkar, one of Lebanon’s poorest governorates, which is also the temporary home for a large number of refugees from Syria.

Continue reading “A report on the challenges meeting development actors in Lebanon”

A report on Lebanon’s ‘October revolution’

Street Solidarity: A Report on Lebanon’s ‘October Revolution’

Author: Erin Cory (Malmö University)
2020

FIELD

Abstract

A report from November 2019, when the revolution was at its beginning.

“The sit-ins and dance parties feel long ago indeed in the face of mounting desperation. Lebanese politics has never lent itself to neat conclusions. Modes of dissent and solidarity, too, quickly change in color and scope in Lebanon, depending on what the moment calls for. We might expect the revolution – and the protests that carry it – to continue in some form, even if only, for the moment, online.”

Continue reading “A report on Lebanon’s ‘October revolution’”

Article on Palestinian refugee identities in Lebanon

Making home in exile: Everyday practices and belongings in Palestinian refugee camps

Author: Erin Cory (Malmö University)
2020

Intellect

Abstract

Palestinians share a history of exile oriented towards the loss and reclamation of a homeland, often expressed through a shared visual lexicon and mythos. In the context of refugee camps, however, local visual culture and everyday practices demonstrate how Palestinian lives are also grounded in local stories and experiences. How do Palestinian refugees deploy everyday practices to create their home spaces? What can these practices reveal about refugees’ myriad belongings? And, in thinking about these practices, what can be said about how a feeling of home can be articulated in exile, which is at its heart the forced removal/dislocation from home?

Continue reading “Article on Palestinian refugee identities in Lebanon”